The Mayoral Roundup

City Paper

The Baltimore mayoral race heated up two weeks ago when incumbent Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced, LBJ-like, that she will not seek re-election next year but will instead concentrate her efforts on the job of mayorin’. Local political handicappers immediately started making book on the who and when: who will jump in the race, and when will they do it (the filing deadline for next April’s Democratic primary—traditionally the race that matters—is Feb. 3).

With this in mind, City Paper offers this handy roundup of the so-far-announced Democratic candidates, some of whom have actually taken the trouble to register their candidacies with the Maryland State Board of Elections. We have included the number of citywide election campaigns each candidate has run, the amount of money they have raised (to the nearest thousand dollars, according to the available campaign finance records), the number of votes they polled in their last citywide race if applicable, and the number of wins they have chalked. Yes, it omits independent candidate Connor Meek. It also omits 7th District City Councilman Nick J. Mosby (0 citywide runs, $73,412 lifetime raised, 0 citywide-race votes, 0 citywide-race wins), author and motivator Wes Moore (0, 0, 0, 0) and State Del. Jill P. Carter (1, $70,000, 2,372, 0), all of whom have reportedly not ruled out runs.
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Rick Black
Runs: 0
Cash: 0
Votes: 0
Wins: 0
Rick Black, an accountant in his first run for public office, has a Facebook page and a website, with a slogan: “we do not accept donations but gladly accept help from volunteers.” Among his promises: lower the salary of the mayor to the average salary in Baltimore. Also, he would cancel the mayor’s health insurance and pension.

Mack Clifton
Runs: 0
Cash: 0
Votes: 0
Wins: 0
A Newark, New Jersey native and nondenominational chaplain, Tirell Alexander Maxwell “Mack” Clifton has been a $40,000-a-year city public works employee for the past six years and claims kinship with King James I, Queen Elizabeth II, Barack H. Obama II (“21st cousin one time removed”) and Benedict Cumberbatch. He is concerned about cancer-causing agents in the work environment, foster-care corruption, and homeless veterans.

Sheila Dixon
Runs: 3 (2 for City Council president, 1 for mayor) ¿Cash: $2.7 million
Votes: 36,726 (2007 general)
Wins: 3
Former Mayor Dixon, who resigned her office as part of a plea deal in a 2010 theft case, has not yet filed her candidacy papers with the state. But she has a campaign website (sheiladixonformayor.com) promising to “Reclaim-Revive-Rebuild” the city. She currently works for the Maryland Minority Contractors Association and collects her mayoral pension of some $80,000 per year on top of that.

Mike Maraziti
Runs: 0
Cash: 0
Votes: 0
Wins: 0
One-Eyed Mike’s campaign website is as yet nonexistent and his Facebook presence is still TBA, but his restaurant website boasts that it is the “Home of the World’s First Grand Marnier Club.” He’s also been a Fells Point business association stalwart for years.

Catherine E. Pugh
Runs: 2 ¿(1 for mayor, 1 for City Council president)
Cash: $1.4 million
Votes: 18,797 ¿(2011 primary)
Wins: 0
State Sen. Majority Leader Catherine Pugh was a Baltimore City councilwoman from 1999-2004. In 2003, she challenged Dixon for City Council president and lost. In 2005 she was appointed to fill a vacated state delegate seat. She won the District 40 Senate seat the next year and has been there since, running for mayor in 2011 (an off year for state legislative elections) and winning a third Senate term in 2014. She was elected Senate majority leader this year. She is also the president of the National Black Caucus of State Legislators.

Carl Stokes
Runs: 1 (1999)
Cash: $423,000
Votes: 32,609 ¿(1999 primary)
Wins: 0
Nationally famous for likening the word “thug,” as used by Mayor Rawlings-Blake during the April 27 riot, to “nigger,” City Councilman Carl Stokes (12th District) is a longtime city lawmaker more locally famous for his advocacy of city audits and his opposition to tax breaks for Harbor East development. He ran for mayor in 1999, finishing second to Martin O’Malley, and has been a charter school administrator and founder as well.

Calvin Young
Runs: 0
Cash: 0
Votes: 0
Wins: 0
Young is a political neophyte with an fresh MBA from Harvard and an engineering degree from New York University. He grew up in Baltimore, graduated from Poly, and has returned to the city to “give back” by running for mayor. His issues are public safety, employment, and education. There are as yet no details or proposals on his website, electcalvinyoung.com. “The city wants and is yearning for a youth voice,” the 27-year-old said in his announcement seeking the office. “I believe I bring to the city a youth voice and a perspective that is new and fresh.”

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