Young Moose's trial postponed, judge reviewing Det. Hersl's records

The trial of Kevron Evans, better known as rapper Young Moose, for a wide variety of drug charges was once again postponed, this time until Nov. 10, because of a defense request for the judge to include the internal affairs records for Det. Daniel T. Hersl, a central figure in Moose's arrest.

The charges stem from a police raid last July, led by Det. Hersl, of the home of Kevin Evans Sr., Young Moose's father. The raid, which was partially justified by evidence in Moose's videos for 'Posted' and 'It's In Me,' resulted in the arrest of most of the rapper's family, including his father, two brothers, and even his mother, who, the elder Evans says, "just pulled up in her car and was handcuffed."

Kevron Evans was not home at the time of the raid and Det. Hersl waited until Aug. 12 to apply for an arrest warrant and served it the following day, three days before Young Moose was scheduled to open for Louisiana rapper Lil Boosie at the Baltimore Arena.

When the rapper was about to be released on bail before the show, according to the "Emergency Petition for Immediate Bail Review," "Detective Hersl went to Kevron's probation officer, Agent Kenneth Henry, and made a series of accusations against Kevron (including drug manufacturing) and showed Agent Henry various music videos starring Kevron, including one in which Kevron appeared to have a gun in his possession (The gun was a video prop). Detective Hersl asked Agent Henry to immediately request a no bail VOP arrest warrant. Agent Henry did so. Detective Hersl then asked Agent Henry to hand carry the VOP [violation of probation] warrant request to the Circuit Court for Baltimore City . . . Although Kevron was just about to be released on bail, the arrival of the VOP arrest warrant prevented his release."

But last October, Judge John Howard declared the denial of bail for Evans as "cruel and unusual" punishment and the rapper was released.

Since then, he has released two more mixtapes—"OTM 3" and "Moose Leroy: The Last Draggin'." The latter contains a remix of his hit song 'Dumb Dumb' featuring Lil Boosie. He is currently working on a movie. He has also since been arrested on several other charges, including assault.

Young Moose has a store called OTM on East Monument Street and the store has been the subject of numerous raids, many of which, according to the Evans family, have not been documented by police. Kevin Evans Sr. shared two videos with City Paper. One shows Hersl leaving the store and the other shows a busted safe, from which Evans claims money was removed and confiscated—without record.

Hersl has been the subject of a number of brutality settlements which, according to Mark Puente's work in The Sun, have cost the city $200,000.

According to Richard Woods, Kevron's attorney, today's postponement resulted from a defense request relating to Det. Hersl, whose internal affairs records are under review by Judge Kendra Ausby to determine whether they may be relevant.

Woods said he tried to subpoena Hersl's Internal Affairs Division records but the request was refused. However, Jerome LaCorte, a public defender representing Kevron's brother, Kevin Evans Jr., learned Hersl's files were being reviewed in a federal case. LaCorte made another request and "Judge Ausby agreed to review his records and those records were delivered to Ausby's chambers on the first of September," Woods said. (La Corte is no longer involved in the case.)

Outside the courtroom, walking with both his mother and father, Young Moose expressed frustration over the holdups. "This is holding my career up and they know it. It's slowing me down from working."

He was on his way, he said, to film a scene in the film "Guns and Grams," which helped him gain release from jail earlier this month. He says he plays "a regular Baltimore young black man."

Of the reports that he has signed to Lil Boosie's Bad Azz Music Syndicate, Moose demurs. "We still gotta get on top of it," he says before getting into the elevator with his parents.

"Do y’all do any music?" I asked his parents.

"It's all him," they both said, smiling with pride.

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