Area man briefly fills content vacuum with tale of mishandled pizza

Twitter places a limit on the number of characters a user can employ, but that doesn't stop people from stringing together successive tweets to tell longer stories. Sometimes, these tweets inexplicaly gain steam and become viral content-sharing experiences.

And when that happens, a local worker at an internet publication or website decides, "Hey, this is something that people will want to read about, so I better publish this string of tweets in a post." (And now I'm making snide content about the act of content creation. Isn't life grand?)

On Jan. 12, such a thing happened for local Twitter user @sad_tree, who recounted his tale of working at a pizza place in Rosedale that was frequented by a man who tucked his pizza boxes under his arm like a notebook.

New York Magazine picked it up, as did popular food blogs First We Feast and Lucky Peach. Meme content sharers Refinery 29 and Cheezburger.com got in on it too. The YouTube channel Buzz60 made a video detailing the nuts and bolts of this "awful pizza etiquette," and that landed the story on the sites of USA Today, WCVB in Boston, WMTW in Portland, Maine, WPBF in West Palm Beach, Florida, and other local TV stations.

Several writers across the Atlantic Ocean even thought the story of a Baltimore-area pizza store worker and his weird encounter were worthy of publication.

When questioned about the veracity of his story, @sad_treet tweeted a series of whiteboard illustrations to better show the details. It ended with this:

So is it bullshit then? Reached by email, @sad_tree, whose email address IDs him as Joe Greenway, writes the story is legit, though "[a] little embellished" for dramatic purposes.

"We'd have Seinfeldesque discussions on whether he was allowed to tuck and if so, should he," he writes. "A lot of head shaking when he came in."

When asked about his brief brush with viral fame, he responded simply: "The internet is a weird place."

Indeed it is.

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