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Scientific Research

A collection of news and information related to Scientific Research published by this site and its partners.

Top Scientific Research Articles see all

Displaying items 1-5
  • Wandering Eye: Martin O'Malley's true crime legacy, the Preakness field takes shape, and more

    Wandering Eye: Martin O'Malley's true crime legacy, the Preakness field takes shape, and more
    The New York Times Upshot blog goes Long Shadow this morning with an analysis of how much money a person loses by spending just one year of their childhood in a low-income area. The story is keyed to the online reader's area, so locals will see a version that is focused on Baltimore and surrounding counties. "Every year a poor child spends in Howard County adds about $110 to his or her annual household income at age 26, compared with a childhood spent in the average American county. Over the course of a full childhood, which is up to age 20 for the purposes of this analysis, the difference adds up to about $2,200, or 8 percent, more in average income as a young adult." Harford County? Minus $490. Baltimore County? Minus $1,150. The city loses you $4,510 per year in salary, according to the analysis. In "The Long Shadow," Hopkins researchers found something similar, but noted that African-Americans in poor neighborhoods did much worse than even similarly poor whites. This article follows a new study by Raj Chetty and Nathaniel Hendren of Harvard. The researchers look at income mobility for the Equality of Opportunity Project. They're at the point where they suggest that growing up in certain counties causes stunted or enhanced income as an adult. The policy implications are obvious, and already begining, as poor people are resettled in rich areas. The implications for growing Baltimore—which ranked 100th out of 100 in the study for nurturing economic opportunity—are dire. (Edward Ericson Jr.)
  • Wandering Eye: The politics of medical specialists (including Rand Paul), a new bio on Grace Hartigan, and more

    Wandering Eye: The politics of medical specialists (including Rand Paul), a new bio on Grace Hartigan, and more
    Shyam Biswal, a professor in the department of environmental health sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, is overseeing an online survey of electronic-cigarette users. The results, according the survey page, will be used to help...

    Wandering Eye: How millennials access media, the battle over scrapping in Detroit, and more

    Wandering Eye: How millennials access media, the battle over scrapping in Detroit, and more
    The Media Insight Project, a joint research effort by the American Press Institute and the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, has put out a new report about how millennials access news, and it has both good and bad news for journalism's...

    Why So Much P.R.?: WYPR seems to routinely trade underwriting for air time. Is that a problem?

    Why So Much P.R.?: WYPR seems to routinely trade underwriting for air time. Is that a problem?
    At 9:30 a.m. on Feb. 10, the voice of John Hoey comes over the public’s airwaves on 88.1 FM, WYPR. The short segment—a monthly show Hoey says he does for free at the behest of station manager and president Anthony “Tony” Brandon&...

    Savage Love: Labia of Love

    Savage Love: Labia of Love
    I have been insecure about the way my vagina looks for as long as I can remember. When I was young, I would fantasize about the day I would grow pubic hair long enough to cover its unsightliness. That day never came, and I was left with an enormous...