Woody Allen

Spike Lee's "Chi-Raq" is surreal, preachy, and rarely dull, if tortuously muddled

Spike Lee's "Chi-Raq" is surreal, preachy, and rarely dull, if tortuously muddled

When it comes to prolific, controversial voices in New York film, Spike Lee and Woody Allen are like two uncles you only see once a year. Woody's really got only one or two stories he likes to tell around the dinner table. You've heard them before, but you listen, mostly out of nostalgia for how much you liked him when you were younger and knew less of his past. Spike's got a lot of stories too, but it isn't the tale he tells that keeps you glued to your seat near the barbecue grill. It's his tone. The voracity with which he demands his voice be heard. He's so charismatic with his gesticulation that you can't help but lend an enraptured ear, even though, given...

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