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Mark Rothko

A collection of news and information related to Mark Rothko published by this site and its partners.

Top Mark Rothko Articles see all

Displaying items 1-5
  • First Blush

    First Blush
    Mark Rothko used paint to create a kind of almost living hum that vibrated off of the canvas. While his hum was overwhelmingly dark and ominous, the works on display in “Blush,” at Gallery CA through July 9, have a similar energy but emit a lighter, whimsical vibe, fitting of the show’s title. You’re not going to walk into the gallery and start questioning the reality of time and space. You might, however, feel a sudden desire for some cool sunglasses and a cold beverage after viewing the lustrous works by Xinyi Cheng, Jeffrey Dell, and Curtis Miller.
  • Best Play

    Everyman Theatre, 315 W. Fayette St., (410) 752-2208, everymantheatre.org The most memorable theatrical production of Baltimore’s 2013-2014 season was Everyman Theatre’s mounting of John Logan’s “Red,” the story of...

    Caleb Stine's new album stares into the void, offers solutions

    Singer-songwriter Caleb Stine's ambitious sixth album, Maybe God Is Lonely Too, houses Americana-tinged songs about death, falling in love, the prison-industrial complex, institutionalized racism, wanting a dog, and the empowering voice of God. There...

    Two revamped hotels offer different models of engagement with the arts community

    Jason Curtis rides a Segway through Mount Vernon with Baltimore City police officers on a Friday night. Curtis is usually chipper, a master of vibrancy. He is the head of the Mount Vernon-Belvedere Association and challenged Carl Stokes for the 12th...

    2013 Top Ten Stage

    Bruce Nelson in RED CLINTONBPHOTOGRAPHY\ 1. RED (Everyman Theatre) Bruce Nelson and Eric Berryman are revelatory as Mark Rothko and his assistant, respectively, in John Logan's play, which deals more seriously with visual art than most visual artists....