FILM FEST FRENZY LISTINGS

(See review)

THE MEND*

Directed by John Margary

(See review)

Directed by Manolo Nieto

When young Uruguayan Ariel relocates from Montevideo to provincial Salto, he tries to maintain his involvement with politics as a student organizer. But he finds the small-town students to be lazy and uninspired, and has a hard time getting any real revolutionary action off the ground.

MOEBIUS

Directed by Kim Ki-duk

Of all the Korean films that filter through to America, an unusually high proportion seem to be disturbing freak fests. That probably has more to do with America than Korea, but those guys sure know how to make disturbing freak fests. Enter Moebius, a sparse film from celebrated South Korean director Kim Ki-Duk with no shortage of violence and sex to flinch at. If you’re squeamish, skip this one.

OBVIOUS CHILD*

Directed by Gillian Robespierre

TV-comedy veteran Jenny Slate plays a 20-something standup comedian, Donna Stern, who keeps falling off the horse but keeps getting back on too. David Cross and Jake Lacy co-star in this well-cast comedy from writer-director Gillian Robespierre.

PING PONG SUMMER*

Directed by Michael Tully

(See feature)

POINT AND SHOOT*

Directed by Marshall Curry

(See review)

PUTNEY SWOPE (presented by DJ Spooky)

Directed by Robert Downey Sr.

(See review)

SEPTEMBER*

Directed by Penny Panayotopoulou

When a lonely woman’s dog dies, she must find a place to bury him in the crowded city where she lives. When she spots the perfect spot in a nearby neighbor’s backyard, she poses the awkward question and finds a place for her dog to rest in peace. The burial opens the door to an uncomfortable and sometimes-intrusive relationship between the woman and the neighbor’s family.

THE STRANGE LITTLE CAT

Directed by Ramon Zurcher

The entirety of this strange little film takes place inside a Berlin apartment and centers upon a boy and the eponymous kitty. The occupants are preparing for a party; meals are cooked, conversations had; and people enter and exit like a stage, making for an almost two-dimensional experience.

STRAY DOGS

Directed by Tsai-Ming Liang