Wednesday: "Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy"

Sept. 14

On September 9, 1971, inmates at the Attica Correctional Facility in Attica, New York, rose up, requesting better living conditions and political rights. They took the prison holding guards hostage and entered into negotiations with state officials. Four days later, the negotiations broke down and police and the National Guard took over the prison, killing 43 people, including and some of the hostages—a stunning example of state violence. There are the pop-culture remnants of it—Al Pacino screaming "Attica" in "Dog Day Afternoon," Archie Shepp's staggering jazz record, "Attica Blues"—and plenty of  writing, but Heather Ann Thompson's new book, "Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy" is perhaps the most comprehensive (it's nearly 800 pages) and focuses on the conditions that led to the Attica uprising and the ways in which police who killed unarmed inmates were protected. Join Thompson at Red Emma's to discuss the book on the 45-year anniversary of Attica. 7:30 p.m., Red Emma's, 30 W. North Ave., (443) 602-7585, redemmas.org, free. (Brandon Soderberg)

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