Wandering Eye: A recipe for 'fucking bacon jalapeño mac and cheese,' remembering Chantel Akerman, and more

The Federal Aviation Administration proposed a $1.9 million fine against a commercial drone operator on Oct. 6, saying SkyPan, a Chicago-based company that uses drones to survey real estate development sites, operated "in a careless or reckless manner so as to endanger lives or property." It's illegal to operate unmanned aircraft for commercial purposes without following strict rules the FAA laid down last year. One drone operator fought his fine, but last November the National Transportation Safety Board agreed with the FAA that commercial drones could be classified as aircraft. Fortune reports that SkyPan has FAA authorization to fly now, but the agency is recommending its largest fine ever for the company's prior behavior. The FAA says SkyPan flew 65 flights over Chicago and New York City between March 2012 and December 2014, 43 of those flights "over highly restricted New York Class B airspace." You need air traffic control clearance to fly in Class B space. "Flying unmanned aircraft in violation of the Federal Aviation Regulations is illegal and can be dangerous," FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said in the press release. "We have the safest airspace in the world, and everyone who uses it must understand and observe our comprehensive set of rules and regulations." (Edward Ericson Jr.)

 

Most likely you've heard about the UConn student who drunkenly blabbed about how much he wanted fucking bacon jalapeño mac and cheese to a student union employee. If you haven't, here's a spoiler: The beligerent privileged kid gets tackled and arrested. Not long after berating, insulting, and cursing at a cafeteria employee, the 19-year-old student is put in handcuffs, which is when he realized "I'm absolutely fucked!" The internet rejoiced in seeing a someone who seemed incredibly privileged get his comeuppance. If we're being truthful, the whole thing also got us wondering, damn, how good is that mac and cheese? Thanks to Gawker, we can find out. The site just released an official-looking recipe for the dish. Enjoy! (Brandon Weigel)

 

Filmmaker Chantel Akerman died earlier this week and the tributes to this difficult, challenging director are pouring in—and they should be. This one by Lindsay Zoladz of Vulture is our favorite and the one by Richard Brody over at the New Yorker is a good introduction to Akerman's work from someone who could easily wax poetically about the small details of the Belgian director's films for pages. Akerman's death wasn't exactly shocking or anything, she was 65, which is old enough to die and it not be "too soon" as it were, but it hit us kind of hard. We will see no more Akerman movies, and as fans, that's unfortunate. But more important, it seems as though Akerman's work so often had to do with surprise, which is how deaths always seem. She made movies about work and boredom and how nothing happens and then all of a sudden something happens and you have to deal with it. Her most "popular" movie, "Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles," a quotidian epic that forces us to watch a woman make food, read to her kid, and make love to paying customers only to, a little past the three-hour mark (the movie's running time is 201 minutes), murder one of her customers. You can check out some of Akerman's work via Hulu, where it's streaming, and you should do that and be grateful—we remember when you had to see these movies by renting rickety VHS copies from Video Americain. (Brandon Soderberg)

Copyright © 2017, Baltimore City Paper, a Baltimore Sun Media Group publication | Privacy Policy
43°