Karen Houppert

Writer

Karen Houppert is City Paper’s Editor. Her reporting has appeared in a wide variety of publications, including The Washington Post Magazine, Newsday, The Nation, Salon, Slate, Mother Jones, Ms, The Village Voice, Al Jazeera, The Baltimore Sun, Urbanite, Style, etc. A former staff writer for The Village Voice, she has won several awards, including a National Women's Political Caucus Award, a 2003 Newswomen's Club of New York Front Page Award, several Nation Investigative Fund grants and a Kaiser Family Foundation Media Fellowship. She is the author of three nonfiction books, The Curse (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1999), Home Fires Burning (Ballantine, 2005), and Chasing Gideon: The Elusive Quest for Poor People’s Justice (The New Press, 2013). These days she is writing about the criminal justice system, race, poverty, education, politics—and their unholy mix here and in the nation at large. For more about her work, visit her website.

Recent Articles

  • The Republic National Convention Day One: Why Melania Trump failed

    The Republic National Convention Day One: Why Melania Trump failed

    Melania Trump had a thankless job. She appeared at the podium of the RNC convention on Monday night clearly tasked with showing the kinder, gentler side of her husband. No mean feat. She followed on the heels of former New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani who had already whipped the crowd into...

  • A baby's birth and a time-traveling walk through Charles Village

    A baby's birth and a time-traveling walk through Charles Village

    The other night I was walking home from the Johns Hopkins' Homewood campus where I occasionally teach, making my way across the mostly empty quad fringed with skeletal trees, down the marble steps at the edge of the library, through the wrought iron gates out into the bustle and streetlights of...

  • Mt. Vernon's Marie Louise Bistro crafts a delicate steak tartare

    Mt. Vernon's Marie Louise Bistro crafts a delicate steak tartare

    When I was a teenager growing up in Brussels, I had a routine on my way to a Wednesday, after school ballet class. For about 80 francs ($2), I'd order a massive sandwich from a bistro with a take-out window near Rue de Boucher, prop myself on some nearby steps, wolf down the food while people-watching,...

  • Straddling the Barbecue Divide

    Straddling the Barbecue Divide

    I.The Urban Grill Barbecuing in Baltimore is a communal affair, like much of city living when the weather gets warm and people spill out onto their stoops or porches, setting up lawn chairs on the sidewalks, perching on car hoods to monitor kids who wobble up and down the sidewalk on bikes, barricading...

  • The Civilian Review Board ups its game

    The Civilian Review Board ups its game

    Baltimore residents who want to file a misconduct or brutality complaint against a police officer typically report to the police themselves—and most people think this is their only option. It's not. Kisha Brown, who directs Baltimore's Office of Civil Rights & Wage Enforcement, oversees the city's...

  • The thrill of victory and agony of defeat on election night: Inside Pugh and Dixon's parties

    The thrill of victory and agony of defeat on election night: Inside Pugh and Dixon's parties

    On Tuesday, a teary-eyed State Sen. Catherine Pugh addressed her volunteers and supporters after squeaking out a narrow victory against former Mayor Sheila Dixon in the Democratic primary for mayor. "Nobody gave this campaign a chance," Pugh said. "I couldn't even get a campaign manager until Feb....

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